Documentation

Cloud Provider Specifics

NOTE: Documentation may change between releases. See the Changelog for links to previous versions of this repository and its docs.

To ensure that you are working off a specific release, git checkout <VERSION_TAG> where <VERSION_TAG> is the appropriate tag for the Ark version you wish to use (e.g. "v0.3.3"). You should git checkout master only if you're planning on building the Ark image from scratch.

While the Quickstart uses a local storage service to quickly set up Heptio Ark as a demonstration, this document details additional configurations that are required when integrating with the cloud providers below:

Setup

AWS

IAM user creation

To integrate Heptio Ark with AWS, you should follow the instructions below to create an Ark-specific IAM user.

  1. If you do not have the AWS CLI locally installed, follow the user guide to set it up.

  2. Create an IAM user:

    aws iam create-user --user-name heptio-ark
    
  3. Attach a policy to give heptio-ark the necessary permissions:

    aws iam attach-user-policy \
        --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/AmazonS3FullAccess \
        --user-name heptio-ark
    aws iam attach-user-policy \
        --policy-arn arn:aws:iam::aws:policy/AmazonEC2FullAccess \
        --user-name heptio-ark
    
  4. Create an access key for the user:

    aws iam create-access-key --user-name heptio-ark
    

    The result should look like:

     {
        "AccessKey": {
              "UserName": "heptio-ark",
              "Status": "Active",
              "CreateDate": "2017-07-31T22:24:41.576Z",
              "SecretAccessKey": <AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>,
              "AccessKeyId": <AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID>
          }
     }
    
  5. Using the output from the previous command, create an Ark-specific credentials file (credentials-ark) in your local directory that looks like the following:

    [default]
    aws_access_key_id=<AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID>
    aws_secret_access_key=<AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY>
    

Credentials and configuration

In the Ark root directory, run the following to first set up namespaces, RBAC, and other scaffolding: kubectl apply -f examples/common/00-prereqs.yaml

Create a Secret, running this command in the local directory of the credentials file you just created:

kubectl create secret generic cloud-credentials \
    --namespace heptio-ark \
    --from-file cloud=credentials-ark

Now that you have your IAM user credentials stored in a Secret, you need to replace some placeholder values in the template files. Specifically, you need to change the following:

  • In file examples/aws/00-ark-config.yaml:

    • Replace <YOUR_BUCKET>, <YOUR_REGION>, and <YOUR_AVAILABILITY_ZONE>. See the Config definition for details.
  • In file examples/common/10-deployment.yaml:

    • Make sure that spec.template.spec.containers[*].env.name is "AWS_SHARED_CREDENTIALS_FILE".
  • (Optional) If you are running the Nginx example, in file examples/nginx-app/with-pv.yaml:

    • Replace <YOUR_STORAGE_CLASS_NAME> with gp2. This is AWS's default StorageClass name.

GCP

Service account creation

To integrate Heptio Ark with GCP, you should follow the instructions below to create an Ark-specific Service Account.

  1. If you do not have the gcloud CLI locally installed, follow the user guide to set it up.

  2. View your current config settings:

    gcloud config list
    

    Store the project value from the results in the environment variable $PROJECT_ID.

  3. Create a service account:

    gcloud iam service-accounts create heptio-ark \
        --display-name "Heptio Ark service account"
    

    Then list all accounts and find the heptio-ark account you just created: gcloud iam service-accounts list Set the $SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL variable to match its email value.

  4. Attach policies to give heptio-ark the necessary permissions to function (replacing placeholders appropriately):

    gcloud projects add-iam-policy-binding $PROJECT_ID \
        --member serviceAccount:$SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role roles/compute.storageAdmin
    gcloud projects add-iam-policy-binding $PROJECT_ID \
        --member serviceAccount:$SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL \
        --role roles/storage.admin
    
  5. Create a service account key, specifying an output file (credentials-ark) in your local directory:

    gcloud iam service-accounts keys create credentials-ark \
        --iam-account $SERVICE_ACCOUNT_EMAIL
    

Credentials and configuration

In the Ark root directory, run the following to first set up namespaces, RBAC, and other scaffolding: kubectl apply -f examples/common/00-prereqs.yaml

Create a Secret, running this command in the local directory of the credentials file you just created:

kubectl create secret generic cloud-credentials \
    --namespace heptio-ark \
    --from-file cloud=credentials-ark

Now that you have your Google Cloud credentials stored in a Secret, you need to replace some placeholder values in the template files. Specifically, you need to change the following:

  • In file examples/gcp/00-ark-config.yaml:

    • Replace <YOUR_BUCKET>, <YOUR_PROJECT> and <YOUR_ZONE>. See the Config definition for details.
  • In file examples/common/10-deployment.yaml:

    • Change spec.template.spec.containers[*].env.name to "GOOGLE_APPLICATION_CREDENTIALS".
  • (Optional) If you are running the Nginx example, in file examples/nginx-app/with-pv.yaml:

    • Replace <YOUR_STORAGE_CLASS_NAME> with standard. This is GCP's default StorageClass name.

Azure

Service principal creation

To integrate Heptio Ark with Azure, you should follow the instructions below to create an Ark-specific service principal.

  1. If you do not have the az Azure CLI 2.0 locally installed, follow the user guide to set it up. Once done, run:

    az login
    
  2. There are seven environment variables that need to be set for Heptio Ark to work properly. The following steps detail how to acquire these, in the process of setting up the necessary RBAC.

  3. List your account:

    az account list
    

    Save the relevant response values into environment variables: id corresponds to $AZURE_SUBSCRIPTION_ID and tenantId corresponds to $AZURE_TENANT_ID.

  4. Assuming that you already have a running Kubernetes cluster on Azure, you should have a corresponding resource group as well. List your current groups to find it:

    az group list
    

    Get your cluster's group name from the response, and use it to set $AZURE_RESOURCE_GROUP. (Also note the location--this is later used in the Azure-specific portion of the Ark Config).

  5. Create a service principal with the "Contributor" role:

    az ad sp create-for-rbac --role="Contributor" --name="heptio-ark"
    

    From the response, save appId into $AZURE_CLIENT_ID and password into $AZURE_CLIENT_SECRET.

  6. Login into the heptio-ark service principal account:

    az login --service-principal \
        --username http://heptio-ark \
        --password $AZURE_CLIENT_SECRET \
        --tenant $AZURE_TENANT_ID
    
  7. Specify a globally-unique storage account id and save it in $AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_ID. Then create the storage account, specifying the optional --location flag if you do not have defaults from az configure:

    az storage account create \
        --name $AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_ID \
        --resource-group $AZURE_RESOURCE_GROUP \
        --sku Standard_GRS
    

    You will encounter an error message if the storage account ID is not unique; change it accordingly.

  8. Get the keys for your storage account:

    az storage account keys list \
        --account-name $AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_ID \
        --resource-group $AZURE_RESOURCE_GROUP
    

    Set $AZURE_STORAGE_KEY to any one of the values returned.

Credentials and configuration

In the Ark root directory, run the following to first set up namespaces, RBAC, and other scaffolding: kubectl apply -f examples/common/00-prereqs.yaml

Now you need to create a Secret that contains all the seven environment variables you just set. The command looks like the following: kubectl create secret generic cloud-credentials \ --namespace heptio-ark \ --from-literal AZURE_SUBSCRIPTION_ID=${AZURE_SUBSCRIPTION_ID} \ --from-literal AZURE_TENANT_ID=${AZURE_TENANT_ID} \ --from-literal AZURE_RESOURCE_GROUP=${AZURE_RESOURCE_GROUP} \ --from-literal AZURE_CLIENT_ID=${AZURE_CLIENT_ID} \ --from-literal AZURE_CLIENT_SECRET=${AZURE_CLIENT_SECRET} \ --from-literal AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_ID=${AZURE_STORAGE_ACCOUNT_ID} \ --from-literal AZURE_STORAGE_KEY=${AZURE_STORAGE_KEY}

Now that you have your Azure credentials stored in a Secret, you need to replace some placeholder values in the template files. Specifically, you need to change the following:

  • In file examples/azure/10-ark-config.yaml:

    • Replace <YOUR_BUCKET>, <YOUR_LOCATION>, and <YOUR_TIMEOUT>. See the Config definition for details.

Run

Ark server

Make sure that you have run kubectl apply -f examples/common/00-prereqs.yaml first (this command is incorporated in the previous setup instructions because it creates the necessary namespaces).

  • AWS and GCP

Start the Ark server itself, using the Config from the appropriate cloud-provider-specific directory: kubectl apply -f examples/common/10-deployment.yaml kubectl apply -f examples/<CLOUD-PROVIDER>/ * Azure

Because Azure loads its credentials differently (from environment variables rather than a file), you need to instead run: kubectl apply -f examples/azure/

Basic example (No PVs)

Start the sample nginx app: kubectl apply -f examples/nginx-app/base.yaml Now create a backup: ark backup create nginx-backup --selector app=nginx Simulate a disaster: kubectl delete namespaces nginx-example Now restore your lost resources: ark restore create nginx-backup

Snapshot example (With PVs)

NOTE: For Azure, your Kubernetes cluster needs to be version 1.7.2+ in order to support PV snapshotting of its managed disks.

Start the sample nginx app: kubectl apply -f examples/nginx-app/with-pv.yaml

Because Kubernetes does not automatically transfer labels from PVCs to dynamically generated PVs, you need to do so manually: nginx_pv_name=$(kubectl get pv -o jsonpath='{.items[?(@.spec.claimRef.name=="nginx-logs")].metadata.name}') kubectl label pv $nginx_pv_name app=nginx Now create a backup with PV snapshotting: ark backup create nginx-backup --selector app=nginx Simulate a disaster: kubectl delete namespaces nginx-example kubectl delete pv $nginx_pv_name Because the default reclaim policy for dynamically-provisioned PVs is "Delete", the above commands should trigger your cloud provider to delete the disk backing the PV. The deletion process is asynchronous so this may take some time. Before continuing to the next step, check your cloud provider (via dashboard or CLI) to confirm that the disk no longer exists.

Now restore your lost resources: ark restore create nginx-backup

Getting Started

To help you get started, see the documentation.